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"Lack of supply teachers is an issue across Scotland"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on September 19, 2013 at 12:30 PM Comments comments (1)



Several councils have told BBC Scotland there has been a drop in the number of supply teachers registered locally.

 

Scotland's biggest teaching union, the EIS, claimed the situation is at crisis point.

 

It argued the main reason is a cut to the amount some supply teachers are paid."


http://www.scotsman.com/news/education/scotland-s-schools-facing-supply-teacher-shortage-1-3101015


http://news.stv.tv/scotland/240093-lack-of-supply-teachers-is-an-issue-across-scotland-warns-union/

"Restoring supply teachers' pay will reassure all"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on September 5, 2013 at 8:00 PM Comments comments (0)
Another good letter from Donald Macdonald in Herald.


Supply teachers must work for five consecutive days in order to be paid the same rate as the teacher they are replacing. If they teach a class for a single day, their pay drops by almost 50%.

 

Zero-hour contracts for professionals are quite common - but they rarely mean you get paid less for being available on stand-by, paid less for the uncertainty of what you'll be earning week to week or paid less for the challenge of adapting to a different classroom of different children every day.

 

It was no surprise that supply teachers voted with their feet and the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities was eventually brought back to the negotiating table by the shortages of supply staff that resulted from such a savage wage cut. These shortages impacted on teachers' ability to undertake continuous professional development and according to the Scottish Secondary Teachers Association, some schools which had not been able to find cover for sick staff had to resort to supervising pupils in their assembly halls instead of teaching them.

 

The irony of this situation is that the General Teaching Council Scotland has just revealed the new professional standards expected from teachers. Scotland needs to decide whether it really values teachers as professionals, otherwise wage cuts for teachers' supply colleagues will just be the thin edge of the wedge. Restoring supply teachers' pay rates to what they deserve and schools require will go a long way towards reassuring teachers that they are all valued professionals.

 

And that's not after three days, but from the minute the school bell rings at 9am.

Donald Macdonald,"

Supply teachers, get ready for schools only calling you for 3 days instead of 5 in future.

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on September 3, 2013 at 6:10 AM Comments comments (2)



"The new agreement will see “short-term supply” redefined, meaning teachers will be paid the full rate after three days, rather than the previous five. Teachers receiving the lower rate will also be paid 10 per cent extra for preparation and correction."


"Lack of teachers cancels Edinburgh school classes"

also in Heralds.

"Pay zero-hours workers equally"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on August 25, 2013 at 6:25 PM Comments comments (1)
A very good letter written by Donald Macdonald in Herald Scotland.


"It is heartening to see that the Scottish Government has suggested that it could bar companies from lucrative public procurement contracts if they have staff employed on zero-hours contracts ("5000 post staff have contracts with zero hours", The Herald August 22).

 

Unions have also railed against staff being uncertain of when they will be offered work, and then being paid less than the staff they work beside. Perhaps we can now expect the Scottish Government to look closely at the decision taken by the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities along with the Educational Institute of Scotland to slash the pay of daily supply teachers who are on zero-hour contracts.

 

Supply teachers are the perfect example of the benefits to both sides when flexibility allows for fluctua­tions in staffing due to continuing professional development (CPD) or sickness. Young teachers look at supply teaching as a way of building experience and their CV. But cuts to the rate of pay now mean young teachers trying to start their adult lives are restricted in earnings and the ability to secure mortgages. Business Secretary Vince Cable has ruled out banning these iniquitous contracts. I suggest that the first reform is that zero-hours staff never work at a pay rate any less than that being paid to the staff they work beside or replace.

 

Donald Macdonald"


"Supply Crisis- Cosla is the barrier to a resolution"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on June 15, 2013 at 8:15 PM Comments comments (0)

 

"Minister weighs into supply pay row"


http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6339868

"Scotland’s largest teaching union, the EIS, wants supply teachers’ pay, which was reduced for periods of five days or less in 2011, to be restored. But Cosla - which represents Scottish councils - claims the move would be unaffordable.

 

TESS understands that Cosla is also sceptical that pay cuts, rather than workforce planning, are behind Scotland’s supply crisis, which has resulted in schools extending assemblies and students being left in canteens because cover was not available.

 

Now the education secretary has entered the fray, stating at the EIS conference on Saturday that the Scottish government and the EIS are “on the same side”, implying that Cosla - the only other party at the table - is the barrier to a resolution.

 

Mr Russell made his comments during a question and answer session after he became the first education secretary to address the union’s annual conference.

 

EIS president Susan Quinn revealed that a seven-week absence in her own school had resulted in just two days’ cover. She asked if the education secretary was aware of the supply crisis and what he was going to do to tackle it.

 

Mr Russell admitted that there was a crisis and said action needs to be taken. The issue has to be “tackled and resolved” through the SNCT, he said, adding that the EIS and the Scottish government are “on the same side”.

 

Billy Hendry, a spokesman for Cosla, described Mr Russell’s comments as “disappointing and populist”.


Scottish teacher job prospects continue to improve(Only if you are a newly qualified).

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on June 14, 2013 at 3:10 AM Comments comments (0)
So what about all of those who have been waiting for years to find a job? I guess experienced unemployed teachers are more expensive than newly qualified. 


Almost half of newly qualified teachers have found full-time permanent jobs since August, according to research.

 

The General Teaching Council for SCotland (GTCS) poll of probationer teachers said 45.1% had found permanent posts, compared with 24.9% a year ago.

 

Those with temporary full-time contracts fell from 34.2% to 24.5%.

 

The figures suggested employment rates were the best since 2006-07. However, GTC admitted the latest data was based on a poor response rate of 16.4%.

 

Only 306 teachers out of a possible 1,863 responded to the Spring 2013 survey."

"Pupils left in the canteen due to the difficulty in finding supply teachers" Larry Flanagan

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on June 7, 2013 at 8:00 PM Comments comments (0)

By Andrew Denholm

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/education/union-warning-of-crisis-in-supply-teaching.21286037 

"COUNCILS have been blamed for failing to address the crisis in supply teaching in Scottish schools which, it has been claimed, has left pupils sitting in canteens or assembly halls rather than being taught."



By CHRIS MARSHALL

http://www.scotsman.com/news/education/scottish-teachers-vote-in-favour-of-strike-action-1-2958192


"SCHOOL assemblies are being extended and pupils left in the canteen due to the difficulty in finding supply teachers, the head of the Education Institute of Scotland has warned.

 

Addressing his union’s AGM in Perth yesterday, Larry Flanagan said parents should be concerned by the current “crisis” in finding short-term cover.

 

Under a deal agreed in 2011, the daily rate paid to supply teachers was halved, leaving many schools unable to find cover.

 

“The current crisis in supply, short-term supply in particular, is not simply a wages and conditions issue – it is having a direct impact on pupils’ learning,” Mr Flanagan said.

 

“Parents in particular should be concerned when pupils are having extended assemblies to cover for absent teachers or are being displaced to canteen areas because supply isn’t available.”

 

Mr Flanagan, who became general secretary of Scotland’s largest teaching union last year, said it was time for the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (Cosla) to “get real” and seek an agreement to bring an end to the situation."

"Exam fears over lack of supply staff"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on January 28, 2013 at 6:15 PM Comments comments (1)

By Ewan Fergus,

http://www.heraldscotland.com/

Similar article in the Evening Times too

http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/

"Hugh Donnelly, Glasgow Local Association Secretary for the EIS, Scotland's largest teaching union, said: "Our members, including heads and deputes, are making significant efforts to cope with the shortage of supply cover.

 

Significant time and effort is being spent on trying to secure supply teachers and rearranging timetables in order that pupils are provided with some cover.

There is little doubt there is a link between short-term supply problems and pay and conditions, and the impact of the reduced rates for short-term supply teaching.

 

The union says teachers are making significant efforts to cope with the situation but says teachers and managers are struggling to meet the needs of young people in Glasgow's schools.

In a statement, the union pointed to an example of a class having been taught by 29 teachers this session because of a subject shortage and says another school was three biology teachers short at one point.

One of the main concerns is the plight of those pupils who will be sitting their Standard Grades and Highers in a few months against a background of significant curricular change. This is putting significant pressure on schools."

 

"A Scottish Government spokesman said: "The employment of teachers, including supply teachers, is a matter for the local authorities.

 

The Scottish Negotiating Committee for Teachers is currently monitoring supply issues and we will play our part in those discussions.

 

The numbers of teachers trained each year includes an allowance to ensure there is a pool of supply teachers from which schools can draw as necessary."


"Glasgow facing supply teacher crisis"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on January 28, 2013 at 2:30 PM Comments comments (0)

"A LACK of supply teachers in Scotland’s biggest city is affecting attainment and exam preparation, the country’s largest teaching union has warned.

 

The Educational Institute of Scotland said it had “serious concerns” about the difficulty finding cover for schools in Glasgow due to controversial changes to pay and conditions.

 

Under working arrangements introduced in 2011, supply teachers now earn just £78 a day ­before tax, compared to about £150 before. Critics of the deal have warned that Scotland is ­facing a “classroom crisis”. "


"Scots teachers wanted for United Arab Emirates"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on January 26, 2013 at 11:55 AM Comments comments (1)


http://www.heraldscotland.com/

By Andrew Denholm.

"THE United Arab Emirates has launched a drive to attract Scottish teachers to work in newly-established state technical schools. The UAE is seeking maths, science, engineering, information technology and English teachers as part of moves to diversify its economy."


"Teachers with a minimum of one year's experience are being recruited to start in August this year on salary packages starting at £3700 a month – equivalent to £60,000 a year here before deductions." 


"The recruitment drive comes at a difficult time for newly qualified staff in Scotland with jobs hard to come by. In recent years, hundreds of newly qualified staff have been unable to find jobs because councils have been cutting overall teacher numbers.

More recently, supply staff have had their pay cut, causing reported shortages across Scotland."

JANUARY/FEBRUARY - "FULL PAY ... OR NO PLAY"!

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on January 4, 2013 at 9:15 AM Comments comments (0)

The "sick" season is nearly upon us. January and February are the months when absences are highest and supply staff are in the greatest demand. It’s a great opportunity to make a stand against the unfair pay rates.

This is what we suggest:

If you are asked to come in on supply, check what rate you will be paid at. We suggest you tell DHTs/HR people that you feel you should be paid at your full rate and that you are only prepared to work on that basis. Many supply teachers are now doing this and many schools and LA’s have realised they must pay the full rate to get supply staff.


JUST SAY NO TO HALF PAY!


What all teachers can do:

We need evidence that the supply situation isn't working. Let us and/or your union rep know about:

· days when classes are unable to get subject specialists (or any supply teachers)

 

· amalgamated classes put into assembly halls or gyms to be supervised by DHTs

 

· teachers being "asked" to go below their minimum contact time (If anyone does that, they will be depriving other teachers of work. If asked yourself, just tell your DHT: “I’d prefer to stick to the proper rules on non-contact time please, thanks”;)

 

It is up to all teachers (regardless of union) to raise these concerns, via reps, so that elected members and the general public know what’s going on!

"Pupils losing out because of supply staff shortages"

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on December 24, 2012 at 7:55 PM Comments comments (0)

"Alan McKenzie, acting general secretary of the SSTA, called for the "derisory" pay rate to be ended and proper salary rates restored.

 

Very few experienced and recently retired teachers are prepared to accept supply posts on the daily rate currently offered. We are also alarmed that many newly qualified teachers are simply leaving the profession when faced with long periods of second-rate payment."


The lost generation of teachers in Scotland

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on November 7, 2012 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (5)

A very heartfelt letter from a fellow supply teacher.

http://www.heraldscotland.com/

Message to all Supply Teachers

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on September 6, 2012 at 2:50 AM Comments comments (0)

Thanks for all of your support. We have crossed the £1100 mark and hopefully soon we will be able to meet our target and start the legal process.

It is nearly a year since this unfair sell-out-deal was enforced. During the last 12 months we have heard from lots of supply teachers who have suffered greatly due to these unfair low pay rates. If you are someone who has suffered financially/ emotionally/ physically due to these rates and would like to try for compensation for the loss, please get in touch.

We need people who have suffered from any or all of these:

Lost earnings due to low rates.

Hardship as they can’t carry on with their normal life such as paying bills/ mortgage.

Have had to move/sell their properties/car as they can no longer afford to pay for these.

 

Send us an email with all the details such as:

How long you have worked as a supply teacher, your pay grade.

How much did you earn before the low pay rates.

How much you earned during the last 12 months.

How this has affected your life style.

Are you married/living with partner/single.

Do you have children.

and anything else you think relevant.

So please let us know as soon as possible if you wish to be considered for a test case or if you know someone who would like to do so, please pass this information to them.

Regards,

 [email protected]

Lets fight to end this Postcode lottery

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on September 1, 2012 at 3:05 PM Comments comments (0)

“We have heard that some LA’s have given schools discretion to pay the fair and proper rate to supply teachers. We have a postcode lottery which is shaming Scottish education!

It is time to end this farce and pay all supply teachers at their due rate –from DAY ONE!”

www.scottishsupplyteachers.com/apps/donations/


Teachers' pay and conditions under threat.

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on August 10, 2012 at 4:45 AM Comments comments (0)

"The pay of supply teachers, so critical in supporting schools, was cut with some seeing their salaries drop by nearly half, forcing many of them out of the profession and creating widespread shortages of temporary staff in Scottish schools."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/teacher-network/2012/aug/10/government-reforms-teachers-scotland

Glasgow City Council wins legal battle against union over using non-teachers in nurseries

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on July 20, 2012 at 4:10 PM Comments comments (0)

 

"A JUDGE has given Scotland’s largest local authority the go-ahead to appoint non-teachers to head nurseries, after throwing out a union’s legal challenge.

The Educational Institute of Scotland (EIS) complained that the move by Glasgow City Council was unlawful, but a judge in the Court of Session in Edinburgh has rejected the claim.

The ruling paves the way for the council to push ahead with plans to have managers, rather than the more expensive qualified teachers, in charge of nursery schools for children aged three to five."

 

"Gerry Moynihan, QC, for the council, said regulations referred to “schools” in the plural, and not to each school individually. He said teacher input could be provided by teachers working in more than one place."


http://www.scotsman.com/news/education/glasgow-city-council-wins-legal-battle-against-union-over-using-non-teachers-in-nurseries-1-2418783


So am I right in thinking that councils can now employ non teaching staff( child development officers) to teach classes as long as there is one registered teacher in a school/council ?


Unions call for stable job opportunities for teachers

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on June 17, 2012 at 5:45 AM Comments comments (0)

"NEW teachers are increasingly being employed on temporary contracts, sparking warnings over the casualisation of the profession in Scottish schools.

Anthony Finn, chief executive of the GTCS, highlighted the increase in temporary contracts, which has heightened existing fears that councils met Scottish Government targets on teacher employment earlier this year by employing staff on a short-term basis. "Too many talented teachers are struggling to find employment and there appears to be a prevalence of temporary teaching contracts which cannot be good for the stability of the profession, and the consistency of teaching for our young people,"

by Andrew Denholm.

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/education/unions-call-for-stable-job-opportunities-for-teachers.17875684


"Only quarter of new teachers in full-time permanent positions in Scotland" by Chris Marshall.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/education/only-quarter-of-new-teachers-in-full-time-permanent-positions-in-scotland-1-2353797

HELP RESTORE PROPER PAY FOR ALL TEACHERS

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on June 5, 2012 at 6:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Scottish Supply Teachers are asking all permanent colleagues to support their campaign to restore professional wages for supply staff. All we ask is a £10 donation to help us take legal action. No-one knows how their circumstances will be in the future and it is in the interest of all teachers and pupils that supply pay is restored to proper rates. Please go to http://www.scottishsupplyteachers.com/apps/donations/ and help the Scottish teaching profession make a stand against the derisory treatment by COSLA and the Scottish Government.

 

 


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