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The lost generation of teachers in Scotland

Posted by Scottish Supply Teachers on November 7, 2012 at 3:50 PM

A very heartfelt letter from a fellow supply teacher.

http://www.heraldscotland.com/

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5 Comments

Reply Rachel
2:13 PM on March 5, 2014 
I agree, things have been swept under the carpet and the situation will get far worse and the children are the ones who will suffer as their educational standards are falling quickly behind their international peers. A real fear in an international, global society. The reason does appear to be because the government still think it is acceptable to use in professions with a 'bedside manner' to pay for the mistakes of risk takers. Education and Health are the biggest budgets of most nations around the world because at some point everyone uses them - they cannot be cut and cut because of risk takers in other areas.

It is is disappointing that our memberships fees have been used by a union that does not seem to be supporting the profession - they are actively encouraging teachers to work below the poverty line, something which is against the principles of which unions were started in the first place.

J Wilson says...
I qualified in Chemistry and Biology in 1988 (now seems like a long time ago !) but the situation was bad then too. I worked in supply and temporary for three years then went to speak to head of staffing at Strathclyde Region who showed me the list of teachers ahead of me and said it would be 5 years until I got a job. Well I moved into working in Universities. And like me, most people from my teaching course moved into other things. Very disappointing as some people had even given up jobs to go into teaching. I believe the situation has never been fully exposed. Even now there are few respondents to the surveys that are done, so no true picture can be worked out. Doing a teaching course should indeed prepare you for many areas of employment but I feel in reality employers see it as specific to teaching and if anything it makes it even harder to find jobs. Especially when at the time I graduated all you used to hear on the news was how many science teachers were needed in England, so everyone assumed I just didnt like teaching which was not the situation at all. So basically I think teaching should be tied much more into employment rather like what happens in the police force. And my brother who was a technical teacher as, for some reason as a engineering graduate, could not get to teach physics, also struggled to get employment even when he had work experience as an engineer....
Reply Rachel
1:57 PM on March 5, 2014 
Teaching activities and seeing children learn things is wonderful but there is a great fear the children of Scotland are falling far behind the world in their advancements. The standard of spelling abilities, writing, maths core skills and reading ages are far below their peers in international schools, many of whom are learning through 2 languages unlike children in Scotland.

Scottish Governments ill-fated plans for independence are scary, if independence is to happen there is a great chance that Scotland will become a third world country that needs bailing out by it's once United Kingdom.
Reply J Wilson
12:39 PM on June 18, 2013 
Yes I completely agree with Luchi that even back in 1990 the EIS did not support the case for temporary and supply teachers. Part of the problem was that to become an EIS rep in a school you tended to typically have been in the school for a few years ie probably a permanent job. So they never represented us. Good luck with this to everyone.
Reply J Wilson
12:36 PM on June 18, 2013 
I qualified in Chemistry and Biology in 1988 (now seems like a long time ago !) but the situation was bad then too. I worked in supply and temporary for three years then went to speak to head of staffing at Strathclyde Region who showed me the list of teachers ahead of me and said it would be 5 years until I got a job. Well I moved into working in Universities. And like me, most people from my teaching course moved into other things. Very disappointing as some people had even given up jobs to go into teaching. I believe the situation has never been fully exposed. Even now there are few respondents to the surveys that are done, so no true picture can be worked out. Doing a teaching course should indeed prepare you for many areas of employment but I feel in reality employers see it as specific to teaching and if anything it makes it even harder to find jobs. Especially when at the time I graduated all you used to hear on the news was how many science teachers were needed in England, so everyone assumed I just didnt like teaching which was not the situation at all. So basically I think teaching should be tied much more into employment rather like what happens in the police force. And my brother who was a technical teacher as, for some reason as a engineering graduate, could not get to teach physics, also struggled to get employment even when he had work experience as an engineer....
Reply luchi
10:51 AM on November 8, 2012 
Thanks to Mr Venditozzi for highlighting the plight of many experienced supply teachers!! My experience of the education system is the same as his. I qualified in 2006 and after completing my probationary year, I went on to do long therm cover in a school in East Dunbartonshire Council. I was there long term for 2 years and was asked to leave before the end of term in my second year. This was done so that I wouldn't accumulate enough days to be entitled to a permanent post. Ever since I have been doing short term and 1 long term cover with the same authority and other local authorities. The newly qualified teachers are preferred for the permanent posts not only because they are cheaper to hire but also because the local authorities want to appear as if they are employing lots of new teachers!!!! The government has forgotten about the rest of us, the ones who have been doing supply for a few years and who haven't manage to secure a permanent post. I have applied for lots of teaching jobs only to see that my experience doesn't count because it is more expensive to hire me!! I hope we can get this unfair deal changed!! We have to unite to get the government to do something because the EIS has forgotten about us-the very union who sacrificed supply teachers in order to get a better deal for everybody else.